Industrial Cracks

This blog is a glimpse into the mind of a history nerd sitting behind a laptop screen. Enjoy a series of ideas he hopes to be thought provoking.
I am quite proud of my Contemplations and Discussing Islam pages. Feel free to contact me anytime.

cognitivedissonance:

kohenari:

The photos and information coming out of Ferguson, MO this evening are shocking.

SWAT teams clearing out fast food restaurants, journalists arrested, full-scale police-as-military response to non-violent protest.

And yet perhaps the most amazing thing is that there seem not to be any elected officials willing to tell this police force to stand down.

There have been elected officials protesting with the people of Ferguson and have been gassed and abused alongside those they represent. However, there must come a point for the governor and/or the DOJ to step in. This must be the end game for police militarization.

(via reagan-was-a-horrible-president)

haitianhistory:

The Haitian Revolution - A short Reading List (of Anglophone scholars)

"More than two hundred years after Haitian independence was declared on January 1, 1804, it remains a challenge to perceive the spirit that fueled the first abolition of slavery in the New World and gave rise to the second independent nation in the Americas. As recently as ten years ago, the Haitian Revolution (1789-1804), which created “Haiti” out of the ashes of French Saint Domingue, was the least understood of the three great democratic revolutions that transformed the Atlantic world in the last quarter of the eighteenth century. That is no longer true. In the decade since the 2004 bicentennial, a genuine explosion of scholarship on the Saint-Domingue revolution has profoundly enriched our memory of what Hannah Arendt, in her comparative study of the American and French revolutions, called “the revolutionary tradition and its lost treasure”. It is not clear to what extent this development has affected broader public understandings of the Haitian predicament, however."

By Professor Malick W. Ghachem for the John Carter Brown Library online exposition: “The Other Revolution: Haiti 1789-1804.”

* Much more scholarship could have been included in this list. To find more monographs and articles on the Haitian Revolution or, for a general reading list on Haiti, see here and here.

(via mochente)

hyungjk:

The Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP) (Arabic: الجبهة الشعبية لتحرير فلسطين) is a Palestinian Marxist-Leninist and revolutionary leftist organization founded in 1967. It has consistently been the second-largest of the groups forming the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO), the largest being Fatah. Currently the PFLP is boycotting participation in the executive committee of the PLO. It considers both the Fatah-led government in the West Bank and the Hamas government in the Gaza Strip as illegal due to the lack of new elections to the Palestinian National Authority since 2006.

The Heroic PFLP is described as a terrorist organization by the Imperialist states of the United States, Canada, and the European Union.

(via amodernmanifesto)

fallen-inspiration:

Take a break from the fandoms and take a moment to read this:

Farah Baker, a 16 year old teen living in the Gaza Strip, has been tweeting and posting on social media sites of the various indiscriminant bombings being committed by Israeli forces, most recently very violent shelling near Al-Shifa hospital by her.

In her countless tweets and numerous posts on both Twitter and Instagram, she documents live strikes using photos and videos to show her followers the severity of the situation her and thousands like her are going through every day. @farah_gazan has gone viral, spiking from 21k to 76k followers on twitter in a span of 24 hours and climbing to 300+ in a matter of hours on Instagram.

Personally, I felt like I was reading something off the diary of Anne Frank. And who knows? Our children might be reading this and asking us why we didn’t stop her from dying just like we did to our grandparents.

The tweets are heartbreaking and the videos are breathtaking. She needs your support. Let her know you stand by her. Follow her on twitter and Instagram and maybe somehow you can change history.

(via muslimrave)

Israel: I just came out to steal your land, terrorize your families and shoot innocent children... but I'm feeling so attacked right now

We came back to Gaza one year ago because my mother was extremely ill (totally blind because of diabetes), and with the Rafah border consistently closed it’s impossible to get someone in her condition to Cairo, let alone to Germany.

Since our return, my children are constantly asking questions. Why don’t kids in Gaza have playgrounds? Why do children play in crowded streets? Why don’t their peers have enough food? It breaks my heart to answer these questions, but at least I know how.

Since the war [latest Israeli assault] started, though, I’m stumped more and more often — and the questions are multiplying. What is happening, Mom? Why are they killing children? (Three of their young second young cousins — Ibrahim, Eman, and Asem — died, along with a pregnant woman and four other children, when Israel fired missiles at their multi-family apartment building. No military target was identified.) Will we die, too? Why do they hate us? Don’t they have children?

Am I supposed to tell them that, yes, we could die at any time from an incoming shell? Surely, I shouldn’t tell them about 19 children of the Abu Jamei family who were killed when a missile fired at one person struck them all as they broke the Ramadan fast one recent evening. How can I explain that, yes, the soldiers who have killed so many children often have children of their own? How can I persuade them that fireworks in Germany signify joy and celebration, while “fireworks” in Gaza cause death?

The most painful question they’ve asked me is a response to our neurotic nighttime habits. One night, I make all three sleep in the same bedroom with us, hoping to increase the odds they’ll survive if a shell hits one of the empty rooms in our house. But then the next night, I’ll separate them, thinking that if I divide my children they won’t all die in an attack. (Unless we’re hit by a half-ton bomb, rather than artillery shell, in which case we’ll all be killed, anyway.)

These are the painful contortions I’d wish on no mother anywhere. Yet mothers throughout Gaza make these decisions every night — and live with the consequences of one ill-fated move. But how am I supposed to answer when Maryam asks, “Why do we sleep somewhere different each night?”

My children, as with all children in Gaza, will need therapy following this carnage. Most, of course, will not receive it. They will enter adulthood remembering these days and the soldiers, F-16s and drones that were heedless of their nighttime cries and terror. Their mothers and fathers — unable to guard their children from these horrors — will need psychological help. And grandparents may have it worse of all, since the midnight terror this month feels terribly like the nights nearly seven decades ago when they were expelled from their homes in what became Israel, never to return.

—    

Wejdan Abu Shammala, “The awful decisions I’ve made to protect my Palestinian children

The Washington Post op-ed. July 30th, 2014.

(via empirescollapse)

(via seulmates)